Monday, 28 April 2014

Meeting of the Barnsley War Memorials Project 6 May 2014

The third meeting of the Barnsley War Memorials Project will be held on Tuesday 6 May 2014 from 2pm to 3pm in meeting room 10 of Barnsley Town Hall.

The Barnsley War Memorials Project's initial aim is to produce a Roll of Honour of the Fallen of the First World War for the Barnsley area.  Further information can be found here.

Items to be covered on 6 May include the new constitution, funding bids, progress, our public profile and accuracy and checking of work.

All are welcome, but please contact us first if you can so that we know how many people to expect.  Supporting papers can be requested from the same contact.

Thank you for your support.

Thurnscoe, St Helens Church, Memorial Window WW1

Memorial Window St Helen's Church, Thurnscoe (photo by PD)
Links:

War Memorials Archive listing

War Memorials Online listing

Photographed by Pete Davies


Newspaper research by BarnsleyHistorian

Inscription:

In Memory of the Men We Loved Who Died for England 1914-1918 Requiescant in Pace.
 

There are no names on this window, however the list of 82 names referred to in the cutting below can be found on our entry for the Memorial Plaque in St Helen's Church.

Barnsley Chronicle 11 March 1922 (thanks to Barnsley Archives)


BWMP #THN04

Friday, 25 April 2014

Penistone, St Andrew's Methodist Church, Memorial Tablet

Memorial Tablet in St Andrew's Penistone (thanks to JD for the photo)

Links:

War Memorials Archive listing

War Memorials Online listing

Photographed by JD in April 2014

Transcribed by BarnsleyHistorian

Thanks to the Rev David Hall for permission to photograph this tablet.  We assume this tablet is from St Paul's Methodist church which used to be on the site of St Andrew's.  If anyone can confirm this please get in touch.
 

Names:
Where further information on a name has been researched by our volunteers it will be linked here (look for the names in blue) to a page on this site or to an external site.


[1914-1919]

Pro Patria
To the Glory of God and in Memory of
Those who gave their Services
In the Cause of Humanity

Allen J,
Ashton W H,
Beever G,
Beever G H,
Beever L,
Birkenshaw A,
Birkenshaw G H,
Bishop C,
Bonner A,
Butcher F,
Butcher G H,
Butcher J E,
Butcher J W,
Calcutt W,
Clark A,
Clark E,
Clark W,
Clarkson A,
Clarkson G,
Clarkson W,
Clegg E,
Clough H,
Eddy G,
Farnsworth ? (some names obscured by poppy cross)
French ?
Gle?
Haw?
Hod?
Houg?
Hurs?
Jagger?
Kilner B,
Knowles H,
Lee T H,
Makin D,
Marshall J,
Marshall W,
Mellor J W,
Mortimer J,
Radley G,
Ramsden W H,
Robinson J,
Smith V,
Sutton H,
Swallow H,
Taylor R,
Travis E,
Travis F,
Travis G,
Travis L
Travis W,
Travis Wm,
Wadsworth N,
Wadsworth Nelson,
Wadsworth W,

? A, 
(names obscured by poppy cross) 
? G E,
? R,
? and F,
? worth Nurse A.

Died on Service

Ashton E,
Calcutt ?,  
(names partially obscured by poppy cross)
 Clarkson ?,
Fennell ?,
Hawes R,
Hodgkinson A,
Knowles E,
Mitchell G,
? r A.



BWMP #PEN07

Monday, 21 April 2014

War Memorial Gravestones in Carlton Cemetery

During both the First and Second World Wars re-repatriation of the bodies of fallen servicemen and women was not usual.  The Unknown Soldier, entombed in Westminster Abbey represents those buried and commemorated overseas who could not come home.  For many families, deprived of a graveside at which to mourn, one solution was to add the name of their lost son (or daughter) to the family gravestone in their local churchyard.  

The Imperial War Museum's War Memorials' Archive defines a War Memorial as "any tangible object which has been erected or dedicated to commemorate those killed as a result of war, conflict or peacekeeping; who served in war or conflict; or who died whilst engaged in military service."  This includes gravestones which commemorate a casualty buried elsewhere.  There must be a clear statement on the memorial (or in a printed document such as a newspaper report from the time) that defines the commemorative purpose of the feature and reports its erection. The full wording of their definition can be found here.

Thus gravestones which include wording such as: died of wounds received in action, killed in action, fell in France, died on active service, reported missing in action, or even killed accidentally while on active service all count as War Memorials.  The wording is a "clear statement" that the purpose of recording that person's name on the gravestone is as a memorial.

Graves which are situated on the site of the burial of a casualty, such as Commonwealth War Graves, are not War Memorials, however the Barnsley War Memorials Project is also collecting their details for inclusion in the Barnsley Roll of Honour.

Carlton Cemetery contains two Commonwealth War Graves. 

In the list below, where the name is blue click to follow the link to a page with a larger photograph and more information.

 Gravestone Location
Section Row No.
Soldier's Name & Regiment
Date of Death
Photograph
*
Kings Own Scottish Borderers

16 May 1917
*
William Owen
RNVR

June 1942
*
Samuel Johnson
HMS Argon

23 October 1918
*
Herbert Turton
RNVR

 21 August 1918
*
Leonard Hall
1/5 York & Lancs

7 July 1916
*
George Edward Kilner
13th York & Lancs

30 March 1918
*
Harry Ferris
1/5 York & Lancs

7 July 1916
*
Wilfred Grove
KOYLI

8 May 1942

BWMP #CRL02

Sunday, 20 April 2014

War Memorial Gravestones in Darton Churchyard and Cemetery

During both the First and Second World Wars re-repatriation of the bodies of fallen servicemen and women was not usual.  The Unknown Soldier, entombed in Westminster Abbey represents those buried and commemorated overseas who could not come home.  For many families, deprived of a graveside at which to mourn, one solution was to add the name of their lost son (or daughter) to the family gravestone in their local churchyard.  

The Imperial War Museum's War Memorials' Archive defines a War Memorial as "any tangible object which has been erected or dedicated to commemorate those killed as a result of war, conflict or peacekeeping; who served in war or conflict; or who died whilst engaged in military service."  This includes gravestones which commemorate a casualty buried elsewhere.  There must be a clear statement on the memorial (or in a printed document such as a newspaper report from the time) that defines the commemorative purpose of the feature and reports its erection. The full wording of their definition can be found here.

Thus gravestones which include wording such as: died of wounds received in action, killed in action, fell in France, died on active service, reported missing in action, or even killed accidentally while on active service all count as War Memorials.  The wording is a "clear statement" that the purpose of recording that person's name on the gravestone is as a memorial.

Graves which are situated on the site of the burial of a casualty, such as Commonwealth War Graves, are not War Memorials, however the Barnsley War Memorials Project is also collecting their details for inclusion in the Barnsley Roll of Honour.

Darton War Memorial is unusual in that it is inscribed with no names of the fallen men of the area.  We have found a list of men that the church warden thought should have been on the memorial and are searching the churchyard and cemetery for any more clues.

In the list below, where the name is blue click to follow the link to a page with a larger photograph and more information.


 Gravestone Location
Section Row No.
Soldier's Name & Regiment
Date of Death
Photograph
*
Alec R Braithwaite

Royal Garrison Artillery

6 June 1918
*
Norman Shaw

KOYLI

2 April 1917
*
George Urquhart MM

York and Lancaster Rgt

11 August 1916
*
George Bostwick

Manchester Regt

30 June 1917
*
*
Henry Vivian Braithwaite

Durham Light Infantry

25 June 1942
*
*
James General Dyson

York and Lancaster Rgt

25 April 1918
*
*
George Ibberson

York and Lancaster

11 October 1917
*
*
Ernest Ives

York and Lancaster

1 July 1916
*
*
Cyril Maples

Royal Navy

11 August 1942
*
*
John Taylor Mellor

Royal Garrison Artillery

15 March 1918
*
*
Horace Pickering

Machine Gun Corps

 24 March 1918
*
*
Samuel Lake Proctor

York and Lancaster Rgt

11 July 1916
*
*
Wilfred Sanderson

10th Hussars

11 April 1917
*
*
Royce Thompson

Royal Field Artillery


22 December 1917
*
Austin Turton

York and Lancaster Rgt

 1 July 1916
*
Benjamin Gerald Wagstaff

Army Service Corps

 20 December 1916
*
*
Charles Milton Ledger

York and Lancaster

9 April 1916
*
*
John Arthur Williams

York and Lancaster Rgt

27 Nov 1917
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*


BWMP #DTN03

Darton Cemetery, Alec R Braithwaite RGA

Alec Braithwaite's Memorial Cross on his family graveplot
Links:

War Memorials Archive listing

War Memorials Online listing

Photograph by ML taken March 2014

Grave Location and Inscription:


In Loving Memory of 
Gnr Alec R Braitwaite RGA
Dearly loved eldest son of George & Annie Braithwaite
Who died from wounds in France 1918, aged 22 years
He gave his bright young life that those he loved might live. (some letters missing)


Alec Roy Braithwaite is buried in St Marie Cemetery, Le Havre, France.  He is also remembered on the list of fallen men in the History of All Saints Church, Darton.



Darton Cemetery, Norman Shaw KOYLI

Shaw Family Gravestone in Darton Cemetery
Links:

War Memorials Archive listing

War Memorials Online listing

Photograph by ML taken March 2014

Grave Location and Inscription: 


In Loving Memory of Winifred,
The beloved daughter of Joseph & Rachel Shaw,
Who died Sept 24th 1909, aged 25 years
Also Pte. Norman Shaw, KOYLI
Beloved son of the above who Fell in France
April 2nd 1917, aged 22 years



Norman Shaw is buried in France in the Merville Communal Cemetery.


War Memorial Gravestones in Monk Bretton Cemetery

During both the First and Second World Wars re-repatriation of the bodies of fallen servicemen and women was not usual.  The Unknown Soldier, entombed in Westminster Abbey represents those buried and commemorated overseas who could not come home.  For many families, deprived of a graveside at which to mourn, one solution was to add the name of their lost son (or daughter) to the family gravestone in their local churchyard.  

The Imperial War Museum's War Memorials' Archive defines a War Memorial as "any tangible object which has been erected or dedicated to commemorate those killed as a result of war, conflict or peacekeeping; who served in war or conflict; or who died whilst engaged in military service."  This includes gravestones which commemorate a casualty buried elsewhere.  There must be a clear statement on the memorial (or in a printed document such as a newspaper report from the time) that defines the commemorative purpose of the feature and reports its erection. The full wording of their definition can be found here.

Thus gravestones which include wording such as: died of wounds received in action, killed in action, fell in France, died on active service, reported missing in action, or even killed accidentally while on active service all count as War Memorials.  The wording is a "clear statement" that the purpose of recording that person's name on the gravestone is as a memorial.

Graves which are situated on the site of the burial of a casualty, such as Commonwealth War Graves, are not War Memorials, however the Barnsley War Memorials Project is also collecting their details for inclusion in the Barnsley Roll of Honour.

There are 20 CWGC graves in Monk Bretton Cemetery.

Barnsley Family History Society started transcribing the memorial inscriptions in Monk Bretton cemetery a few years ago however they have not published them all yet.  A computer disk of inscriptions and memorials in the churchyard and church is available to buy. They should be able to provide information on the memorials in the cemetery by request to their Searches Officer.  We are grateful to the Barnsley Family History Society for providing a list of the memorial gravestones and their inscriptions for this cemetery.

In the list below, where the name is blue click to follow the link to a page with a larger photograph and more information.


 Gravestone Location
Section Row No.
Soldier's Name & Regiment
Date of Death
Photograph
H 98
John Thomas Johnson

8th KOYLI

6 June 1917
A 222
Alice Hilda Lancaster

T.F.N.S

3 June 1918
A036
John W Heath

A.S.C.

8 January 1916
A159
Joseph Carr

King's Own Yorkshire LI

16 September 1916
A188
Bernard White

West Yorkshire Regiment

21 November 1917
A201
Samuel Gammons

8th East Yorkshire Regt

10 December 1916
B007
Charles Pickles

Royal Field Artillery

14 March 1917
C088
Rowland Jones

West Riding Regt

14 October 1918
E004
Thomas William Victory

York & Lancaster Regt

1 July 1916
G014
Herbert Musgreave
Liverpool Regt  
28 October 1916

Thomas Musgreave
Canadian Expeditionary Force
12 April 1917
G069
Robert Craven

Royal Garrison Artillery

22 January 1917
G088
Thomas Hilton Horbury

Royal Garrison Artillery

12 May 1917
I015
Henry Silcox (or Silcock)

Kings Own Yorkshire LI

11 October 1916
*
*
*
A063
Albert McGowan

23 October 1941
*
C067
Thomas Myers

14 June 1942
*
E029
Fred Trimby

6/7 September 1943
*
E105
Alfred Goodman

12 September 1944
*
O007
Amos Howe

1 March 1943
*
O010
Edward Bessant
10 June 1942
*
P057
John Harrison

11 May 1945
*
Q011
Harry Williamson

30 January 1944
*


BWMP #MNK01

Monk Bretton Cemetery, Alice Hilda Lancaster TFNS

Alice's mother's gravestone in Monk Bretton Cemetery
Links:

War Memorials Archive listing

War Memorials Online listing

Photograph by BarnsleyHistorian taken 9 December 2013

Grave Location and Inscription:

Section A No.222, which is on the right as you walk down the path from gate.  The stone is right at the back of the section near the boundary wall.

Alice Halliday, The beloved wife of Thomas Lancaster
The Cliffe, Monk Bretton.
Born September 20th 1844, Died August 17th 1895.
Also Thomas Edward, Son of the Above,
Who died at Stretford, Manchester
February 4th 1909, aged 31 years.
Also Alice Hilda Lancaster, Daughter of the above,
Special Military Probationer T.F.N.S.
Accidentally drowned in France,
June 3rd 1918, aged 35 years.
Many Waters Cannot Quench Love

Read more about Alice Hilda on Barnsley Soldiers Remembered and here on a blog post which contains more information about the circumstances of her death.

Alice Hilda is also remembered on the
Monk Bretton, War Memorial, Cross Street, Monk Bretton and Monk Bretton, St Paul's Church, WW1 Memorial Tablet

  
BWMP #MNK01/01

Monk Bretton Cemetery, John Thomas Johnson KOYLI

Johnson Family Gravestone in Monk Bretton Cemetery

Links:

War Memorials Archive listing

War Memorials Online listing

Photograph by BarnsleyHistorian and taken in 2010.

Grave Location and Inscription: 

Section H, No.98 which is on the left as you walk down the path from the cemetery gate.  Look for the little markers on the edges of the sections.


In Loving memory of
 Ann the beloved wife of George Johnson
 Who fell asleep April 9th 1911 aged 56 years
 Thy purpose long we cannot see
 but all is well that's done by thee


 Also JOHN THOMAS JOHNSON
 8th K.O.Y.L.I. son of the above
 who died from wounds received in
 Action in France, June 6th 1917
 Aged 22 years Thy will be done


 Also Jane beloved daughter of the above
 who died May 22nd 1923 aged 36 years
 Also the above named George Johnson
 who died 22nd February 1924
 aged 71 years


Read more about John Thomas Johnson on Barnsley Soldiers Remembered

and here in a blog post about him.

John is also remembered on the
Monk Bretton, War Memorial, Cross Street, Monk Bretton and the Monk Bretton, St Paul's Church, WW1 Memorial Tablet and in the Monk Bretton, St Paul's Church, WW1 Memorial Book.

He is buried at Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery in Belgium and commemorated on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website. 


BWMP #MNK01/02

Wednesday, 16 April 2014

Stairfoot, Wesleyan Reform Church, Memorial Window, Soldiers & Sailors

One of eight matching windows in the Wesleyan Reform Church,
this one is dedicated to Soldiers and Sailors from the Church
(photo taken 9 April 2014)
The dedication on the Soldiers and Sailors window (photo taken 16 April 2014)

Links:

War Memorials Archive listing

War Memorials Online listing

Photographed by BarnsleyHistorian and Nigel Croft

There are no names on this memorial.


Inscription:
In grateful remembrance of the Soldiers and Sailors from this Church who died for their Country in the Great War.

The other windows in the Church commemorate various local people and the Rev William Clough, pastor at the Church from 1891 to 1916.  For a newspaper report referring to the dedication of these windows follow the link to the Stairfoot, Wesleyan Reform Church, WW1 Roll of Honour page.

Stairfoot, Wesleyan Reform Church, WW2 Memorial plaque, Hunningley Lane

WW2 Memorial Tablet (taken in poor light conditions on 9 April 2014)

Links:

War Memorials Archive listing

War Memorials Online listing
 

Photographed by BarnsleyHistorian

There are no names on this memorial.


Inscription:
In Remembrance
We the members of this church and district honour those who served in the defence of our country 1939-1945
"Blest be the tie that binds our hearts in Christian Love" Rev John Fawcett

Tuesday, 15 April 2014

Elsecar, Holy Trinity New Churchyard, Harry Lipscombe HLI

Harry Lipscombe's parents' grave in Elsecar New Churchyard
(photo taken 6 April 2014)
Links:

War Memorials Archive listing

War Memorials Online listing

Photograph by BarnsleyHistorian

Grave Location and Inscription:
This grave is in the section of the church yard across the road from Holy Trinity Church, Elsecar.  It is roughly straight ahead almost to the far wall as you enter the gate and then turn right.


In Loving Memory of / William the Beloved Husband of Ellen Lipscombe, / Who died Jan 17th 1930 , aged 68 years / Also the above name Ellen Lipscombe / Who died March 14th 1935, aged 72 years / Also Harry, their beloved son / Who was Killed in Action in France / April 9th 1918, aged 22 years / Till the Day Break.

Harry is also remembered on the WW1 Memorial Plaque at Holy Trinity Church, Elsecar,
on the Hoyland War Memorial and on the Barnsley British Co-operative Memorial Tablet.

Harry is buried in the Pont-du-Hem Military Cemetery, La Gorgue, in France and is commemorated on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website. 



BWMP #ELS04/2

Elsecar, Holy Trinity Old Churchyard, Louis Stringer KOSB

Louis Stringer is remembered on his Grandparents' grave in Elsecar Churchyard
(photo taken 6 April 2014)
Links:

War Memorials Archive listing

War Memorials Online listing

Photograph by BarnsleyHistorian

Grave Location and Inscription:

This gravestone is at the bottom of the old churchyard near the wall separating it from Wath Road.

In Loving Memory of Israel,
The Beloved Husband of Mary Stringer
Who fell asleep Jany 1st 1911
Aged 71 years
Also of the above named 
Mary Stringer
Who fell asleep Jun 6th 1917
Aged 76 years
Louis Stringer son of Seymour & Harriet Stringer
And Grandson of the aforementioned 
Who fell at Gallipoli
Dec 29th 1915 aged 18 years

Louis was born in Elsecar, but he, his parents and siblings were living at 83 the Common, in Ecclesfield in 1911 - it is possible he is also remembered on a memorial in that area.


He is buried in the Pink Farm Cemetery in Helles, Turkey and remembered on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website.  



BWMP #ELS04/01

Elsecar Cemetery, Ernest Guest NF & Frank Guest RND

Ernest and Frank Guest are remembered on their parents' gravestone
(photo taken 6 April 2014)
Links:

War Memorials Archive listing

War Memorials Online listing

Photograph by BarnsleyHistorian

Grave Location and Inscription: 

This gravestone can be found in Elsecar Cemetery, behind the church.

In Loving Memory of / Edith the Beloved Wife of Luke Guest / Died July 27th 1940 Aged 65 years / Also the Above Named Luke Guest / Died Jan 17th 1949 Aged 81 years / Also their son Pte Ernest Guest N.F. Regt / Killed in Action in France April 9th 1917 / Also their son A.B. Frank Guest RND / Died in Rotterdam Hospital Dec 5th 1918 / Aged 22 years / In God's Keeping.

Ernest and Frank are also remembered on the WW1 plaque in Elsecar Holy Trinity Church, and the Jump and Hemingfield War Memorial.


Ernest is buried in the Bailleul Road East Cemetery, St Laurent-Blangy, in France and is commemorated on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website.

Frank is buried in the Amersfoort General Cemetery in the Netherlands and is remembered on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website.



BWMP #ELS01/02

War Memorial Gravestones in Elsecar Churchyard and Cemetery

During both the First and Second World Wars re-repatriation of the bodies of fallen servicemen and women was not usual.  The Unknown Soldier, entombed in Westminster Abbey represents those buried and commemorated overseas who could not come home.  For many families, deprived of a graveside at which to mourn, one solution was to add the name of their lost son (or daughter) to the family gravestone in their local churchyard.  

The Imperial War Museum's War Memorials' Archive defines a War Memorial as "any tangible object which has been erected or dedicated to commemorate those killed as a result of war, conflict or peacekeeping; who served in war or conflict; or who died whilst engaged in military service."  This includes gravestones which commemorate a casualty buried elsewhere.  There must be a clear statement on the memorial (or in a printed document such as a newspaper report from the time) that defines the commemorative purpose of the feature and reports its erection. The full wording of their definition can be found here.

Thus gravestones which include wording such as: died of wounds received in action, killed in action, fell in France, died on active service, reported missing in action, or even killed accidentally while on active service all count as War Memorials.  The wording is a "clear statement" that the purpose of recording that person's name on the gravestone is as a memorial.

The burial ground at Elsecar is separated into the Old Churchyard - which adjacent to the Holy Trinity church, the New Churchyard  - which is over the road in a separate area and the Cemetery which is behind the church - go to the east end of the Old Churchyard and look for the gate.   Local history and Church records including Monumental Inscriptions, in many cases taken before the stones fell or were lost, can be accessed in Holy Trinity Church on Mondays between 10.30am and 2.30pm when volunteers will be present to help you plus teas and coffees are available.  More information here.

Graves which are situated on the site of the burial of a casualty, such as Commonwealth War Graves, are not War Memorials, however the Barnsley War Memorials Project is also collecting their details for inclusion in the Barnsley Roll of Honour.

There are two Commonwealth War Graves at Elsecar, one in the New Churchyard and one in the Cemetery.

Further information and usually a larger photograph have been provided where the name is coloured blue, click to follow the link.


 Gravestone Location
Section Row No.
Soldier's Name & Regiment
Date of Death
Photograph
Cemetery
2 N/C
Ernest Guest
Northumberland Fusiliers
9 April 1917

Frank Guest
Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve
5 December 1918

Cemetery

Bernard Clifton 

R A F

29 February 1944
Old Churchyard
Louis Stringer

King's Own Scottish Borderers

25 December 1915
Old Churchyard
Fritz Harry Leach

Black Watch

23 April 1917
New Churchyard
4
Ernest Frederick Whittlestone

Coldstream Guards

15 May 1918
New Churchyard
Harry Lipscombe

Highland Light Infantry

9 April 1918
New Churchyard
42

Harold Oxspring Lowbridge
R A F
25 August 1944 

New Churchyard
174/175
Reginald Naylor

Durham Light Infantry 

6 November 1917
New Churchyard
321
Clifford Portman

Leicestershire Regt

28 September 1917

(fallen face down)
New Churchyard
405
Wilfred Hirst

West Yorkshire Regiment

2 April 1918

(fallen face down)
New Churchyard
12 TP
Peter Bosworth

R A F

26 July 1945



BWMP #ELS01 & #ELS04